Chess By Blog – Examples

Static game examples

This is a game played between Anatoly Karpov and Gary Kasparov at the 31st World Championship in Moscow. The PGN file, along with the special surrounding div tags used by the Chess By Blog plugin, looks like this:

<div class="CBB-board" style="display:hidden;">
[Event "World Championship 31th"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "1984.09.24"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Karpov, Anatoly"]
[Black "Kasparov, Gary"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e6 7.O-O Be7 8.f4 O-O 9.Kh1 Qc7 
10.Bf3 Nc6 11.a4 Re8 12.Be3 Rb8 13.Re1 Bd7 14.Qd3 Nxd4 15.Bxd4 e5 16.Ba7 Rbc8 17.Be3 
Qc4 18.a5 h6 19.h3 Bf8 20.Bd2 Qd4 21.Be3 Qb4 1/2-1/2
</div>

The position after the 21st move by Black is drawn below by the Chess By Blog plugin.

[Event "World Championship 31th"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "1984.09.24"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Karpov, Anatoly"]
[Black "Kasparov, Gary"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e6 7.O-O Be7 8.f4 O-O 9.Kh1 Qc7
10.Bf3 Nc6 11.a4 Re8 12.Be3 Rb8 13.Re1 Bd7 14.Qd3 Nxd4 15.Bxd4 e5 16.Ba7 Rbc8 17.Be3
Qc4 18.a5 h6 19.h3 Bf8 20.Bd2 Qd4 21.Be3 Qb4 1/2-1/2
  

The plugin preserves and displays comments in the PGN movelist. Here is a heavily annotated game between Anderssen and Kizeritzky with the starting position shown at the beginning of the game.

[Event "?"] 
[White "Anderssen"]
[Black "Kizeritzky"]
[Date "1851.??.??"]
[Result "1-0"]
[JsCom "startply 0"]
{King's Gambit, 23 moves. In one of the most remarkable games ever, Andersson sacrifices a bishop, then two rooks, and finally his queen.}
1. e4 {This often leads to open games with tactical possibilities.}
1... e5 2. f4 {The King's Gambit. White sacrifices a pawn for control of the center square d4 and the possibility of his King's rook becoming active on the f file.}
2... exf4 3. Bc4 {This variation is called the Bishop's Gambit. White should not play 3. d4 because then 3... Qh4+ is good for Black since White would have to play 4. Ke2. A common move for White is 3. Nf3.}
3... Qh4+ {This looks threatening but actually is not the best move. Better are 3... d5 giving back the pawn and 3... Nf6.}
4. Kf1 {The king is more securely placed here than it appears, and White can gain an important tempo by attacking the Black queen with Nf3.}
4... b5 {A counter sacrifice to gain time and development. This move is not looked upon favorably nowadays.}
5. Bxb5 Nf6 {Developing and attacking the pawn on e4.}
6. Nf3 Qh6 {The queen would have been better placed on h5, but Black plans to move his knight to h5.}
7. d3 {Guarding the pawn and opening lines for the bishop.}
7... Nh5 {Threatening 8... Ng3+ 9. hxg3 Qxh1+.}
8. Nh4 {Stopping the threat and preparing to put the knight on f5 where it will be powerfully placed.}
8... Qg5 9. Nf5 c6 {If now 10. Ba4 then 10... d5 gives Black a satisfactory game.}
10. Rg1 $3 {A splendid piece sacrifice.}
10... cxb5 11. g4 {Black cannot play 11... fxg3 en passant because of 12. Bxg5.}
11... Nf6 12. h4 Qg6 13. h5 Qg5
14. Qf3 {Threatening 15. Bxf4 trapping the queen. The bottled up position of the Black queen is amusing.}
14... Ng8 {To save the queen.}
15. Bxf4 Qf6 16. Nc3 {White now has an enormous lead in development, definitely worth more than a piece.}
16... Bc5 17. Nd5 {The beginning of an extraordinary run of brilliant sacrifices.}
17... Qxb2 {Threatening 18... Qxa1+.}
18. Bd6 $3 {If now 18... Qxa1+ then 19. Ke2 Bxg1 20. e5 $3 reaches the same position as in the game.}
18... Bxg1 19. e5 $3 {Cutting the queen off from the defense of the kingside. White now threatens 20. Nxg7+ Kd8 21.Bc7#.}
19... Qxa1+ 20. Ke2 {White still threatens 21. Nxg7+ Kd8 22. Bc7#. If 20... f6 then 21. Nxg7+ Kf7 22. Nxf6 Kxg7 23. Ne8+ Kh6 24. Qf4#. Black's best may be 20... Ba6 but White still maintains a winning advantage after 21. Nc7+ Kd8 22. Nxa6 (Threatening 23. Bc7+ Ke8 24. Ne6+ Ke7 25. Qxf7#) 22... Bb6 23. Qxa8 Qc3 24. Qxb8+ Qc8 25. Qxc8+ Kxc8 26. Bf8 h6 27. Nd6+ Kd8 28. Nxf7+ Ke8 29. Nxh8.}
20... Na6 {To prevent 21. Nxg7+ Kd8 22. Bc7#}
21. Nxg7+ Kd8 22. Qf6+ $1 {Forcing the knight to remove its protection from e7.}
22... Nxf6 23. Be7#
1-0
  

The plugin supports Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN), which allows for descriptions of arbitrary starting positions – this is useful for setting up chess problems which are outside normal play. The plugin also fully supports Fischer Random Chess (Chess960) and the castling rules specific to that variant. As an example, here is the position after 7 moves for the final match of the Mainz Chess Classic Chess960 tournament in 2007 between Viswanathan Anand and Levon Aronian. The opening position is described using the FEN tag:
[FEN "rnbkqnrb/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBKQNRB w KQkq - 0 1"]
[Event "Mainz Chess Classic"]
[Site "Mainz GER"]
[Date "2007.08.16"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Anand, Visnawathan"]
[Black "Aronian, Levon"]
[Result "*"]
[Setup "1"]
[FEN "rnbkqnrb/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBKQNRB w KQkq - 0 1"]
1.c4 g6 2.d3 d5 3.cxd5 Qa4+ 4.Kd2 c6 5.Nc3 Qa5 6.e4 Nfd7 7.Ne3 b5
  

Interactive open game examples

In this second example, the board is blank but now interactive. The presence of the special CBBWhiteId and CBBBlackId PGN tags control who get to play.

<div class="CBB-board" style="display:hidden;">
[CBBWhiteId "*"]
[CBBBlackId "*"]
</div>

You should be able to play a game against yourself below. Your moves are not persistent, and will not update this post in the database.

[CBBWhiteId "*"]
[CBBBlackId "*"]
  

The plugin also has limited support for chess variants with different board sizes, and for Capablanca variants (in particular, Capablanca Random Chess). The Archbishop and Chancellor pieces are fully supported, and can be specified together with a 8×10 board by using a FEN tag like this:

[FEN "rnbqkcabnr/pppppppppp/10/10/10/10/PPPPPPPPPP/RNBQKCABNR w KQkq - 0 1"]

Resulting in a playable board:

[CBBWhiteId "*"]
[CBBBlackId "*"]
[Result "*"]
[FEN "rnabqkcbnr/pppppppppp/10/10/10/10/PPPPPPPPPP/RNABQKCBNR w KQkq - 0 1"]
  

Interactive closed game example

Changing one or both of the CBBWhiteId and CBBBlackId tags to the userid of a WordPress blog author who has edit permissions on the post (as shown below) will allow them to make a move that will be posted to the blog immediately. In the example shown, the WordPress user “levork” will be able to play White against the WordPress user “dantes”, assuming that both users have been created and have the appropriate WordPress roles. The game will be closed to all other readers.

<div class="CBB-board" style="display:hidden;">
[CBBWhiteId "levork"]
[CBBBlackId "dantes"]
</div>

4 thoughts on “Chess By Blog – Examples

  1. Hello,

    Is it possible to create a list of chess puzzles inside of one position ? This feature of having a database of fen positions with their solutions which automates to the next position once the correct answer is entered is a really needed feature that I am looking for with my training site.

    Thanks for the help.

    Crl

  2. The plugin supports Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN), which allows for descriptions of arbitrary starting positions – this is useful for setting up chess problems which are outside normal play. The plugin also fully supports Fischer Random Chess (Chess960) and the castling rules specific to that variant. As an example, here is the position after 7 moves for the final match of the Mainz Chess Classic Chess960 tournament in 2007 between Viswanathan Anand and Levon Aronian. The opening position is described using the FEN tag:
    [FEN "rnbkqnrb/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBKQNRB w KQkq - 0 1"]
    I fail to succeed.Could you tell me should I insert:
    1.only [FEN "rnbkqnrb/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBKQNRB w KQkq - 0 1"]in html in word press(but the trial failed)
    2.only .only [FEN "rnbkqnrb/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBKQNRB w KQkq - 0 1"] in visual(also failed)
    3.Or between [FEN "rnbkqnrb/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBKQNRB w KQkq - 0 1"] (also failed only a chessboard.
    What shall I do?

  3. Hello

    I activated this plugin in wordpress 3.1….Unfortunately I dont see the “chess by Blog” in the quicktag panel
    What could be the problem ?

    pls help

    Thanks

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